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Review of ‘On Magnetism’

We’ve just spotted a thoughtful review of ‘On Magnetism‘ by Steven Matthews, in the latest edition of the Stand magazine.

‘The grammatically compact phrases hold opposites together so that the force of art facilitates the contraries in perspective.’ ‘…imagination attracts memory so that the two provide a space for longevity and reflection.’ —Lucy Cheseldine

Matthews

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Geoff on TV! Talking about Broad Street Chapel

Great interview with Geoff Sawers, author of ‘Broad Street Chapel and the origins of dissent in Reading‘ on That’s Thames Valley TV. The event he talks about was last week – part of Heritage Open Days. But the book’s still available!

Sawers_BSC

 

 

The event was last week but the book’s still available!

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Sue Leigh reads from ‘Chosen Hill’

Chosen Hill book cover

Sue will be reading from ‘Chosen Hill’ at The Pitshanger Bookshop, in Ealing on Thursday, 10th October.  6.30pm for 7pm

Leigh’s poems are brief, and employ minimal punctuation; the questions they consider, on the other hand, are expansive. Many of them read as meditations on how to exist in the world, and how we might accept the chance happenings of life. – Suzannah Evans, in the TLS

‘Masterly control’ – Jennifer Edgecombe,  in PN Review

 

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Exhibition of artwork inspired by Oscar Wilde’s ‘Ballad of Reading Gaol’

Have you seen this yet? It’s on at the Turbine House till Sunday 15th Sept, open daily, 10-6pm, and has been featured on ITV news (watch their short film here). The decor of the exhibition space coincidentally goes rather well with the cover of our new edition of the poem!

Gaol exhibitionIMG_7846Ballad ed 3 reprint 4

 

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Michael Begnal’s review of Penumbra

Here’s a thoughtful and thought-provoking review of Kate Behrens’s ‘Penumbra‘ from Michael Begnal, recently published in ‘Empty Mirror

“Penumbra” is one of those words that I always think I know the meaning of, but then I realize I need to look it up again to make sure. … There is no poem called “Penumbra” in this, Kate Behrens’s third collection, but the word works well as an all-inclusive title, for Behrens writes about the shadowy and the marginal, and the way that death or deaths bring previously indefinite feelings into stark, vivid relief.